PhD Courses in Denmark

Sociology of Emotions

Copenhagen Graduate School of Social Sciences

Aim of the course

The aim of the course it to familiarize students with classical and contemporary perspectives in the sociology of emotions, to enable students to critically discuss theoretical assumptions, methodological approaches and empirical results within the sociology of emotions and to construct a theoretical framework and methodological approach to a specific research problem in the student’s own ongoing or planned project.

Course content

The study of emotions is inherently multidisciplinary as it engages with biological and psychological as well as social and cultural theory and research. With this point of departure, the focus of the sociological discipline, as well as of this course, is on the social, and sociologically relevant, aspects of emotions. The course offers a broad overview of theories and research in the sociology of emotions, spanning from the classics to contemporary theories and research. Both structural and situational/interactional approaches to the role of emotions in social life are explored. Part of the course deals with the students’ research projects, through which there is opportunity to discuss project ideas in relation to the various perspectives on emotions presented. There will also be opportunity to discuss various methods employed and ways to apply and develop theory in the analysis of empirical data. All participants are required to read and relate some key texts (compulsory literature), but thereafter encouraged to focus independently on their own area of research.

The course begins with a series of lectures on sociological approaches to emotions, some current debates, and the exemplification of ongoing research projects. These lectures are followed by a series of short workshops where participant’s ideas and possible approaches are worked out with guidance from the teachers. An online midterm seminar, to discuss abstracts for exam papers, will be arranged about midterm of the course period. For the remaining part of the course students develop their papers and expand their chosen area of specialization, adding relevant emotion sociological literature. The course ends with the presentation and discussion of a working paper (optionally as a draft journal article) at the final seminar of the course. (see course plan below)

Written and oral presentations take place throughout the course. Participants partake in at least two seminars (midterm and final) where they present their own work as well as comment on the work of other participants.

The course offers both a broad perspective on the state of the art of the sociology of emotions, as well as in-depth specialization in the chosen research area of each student.

The course is offered in collaboration between The Department of Sociology at the University of Copenhagen, the Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg and the Department of Sociology and Social Work at Aalborg University.

The course runs on half-time (50%) over ten weeks.

Course teachers

Course language

The teaching language of the course is English.

Target group

This PhD course addresses both PhD students unfamiliar with the sociology of emotions and PhD students who are more experienced with the field. The first group will obtain knowledge about the key concepts, theoretical traditions and methodological discussions in the field. The second group will obtain new perspectives on their own work through the attentiveness to theoretical development, methodological concerns and discussions of how to apply theories and concepts in specific analyses.

Location

The introductory series of lectures, seminar and workshops is located at the Department of Sociology at the University of Copenhagen, the final seminar is located at the Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg. The midterm seminars will take place online via Zoom. The course has no fee but travel and accommodation costs as well as all meals need to be covered by each student’s home department.

Seminars

The purpose of the online midterm seminars is to develop one’s research with emotion sociological perspectives in a synopsis of the course paper (1500-2000 words), which will be commented and discussed at the seminar. Students will read and comment on each other’s synopsis. See further information below.

The final seminar is a paper seminar with two appointed student commentators on each paper.

Course teachers will be participating in the seminars and commenting on the papers too.

Registration for the course

The course is only open for doctoral students. Students from Sweden register in FUBAS and any queries regarding this will be answered by Anna-Karin Wiberg (Anna-karin.wiberg@gu.se). Danish students register with KU. In your e-mail state that you are registering for the PhD-course sociology of emotions, including name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, affiliation and supervisor. All students (Swedish and Danish) include a ½ page statement of the expected relevance of the course for your doctoral research. Swedish students upload this in FUBAS, and Danish students send it as an attachment to your e-mail. If more than 18 students register for the course, we will use these descriptions as a basis for deciding who will be enrolled in the course. Once you know that you are accepted for the course you will be asked to submit an extended paper describing your project (max 2000 words) no later than February 23. This paper will be discussed in groups during the first seminar. See deadlines below.

Registration is done before deadline January 17, 2022, in FUBAS (Sweden) or via e-mail (Denmark) to: phd@hrsc.ku.dk                        

Examination

Learning outcomes will be examined through an individually written working paper (see below). It is also possible to participate without paper. Participants without paper are required to participate in the introductory days and the mid-term seminar and will receive 3,5 ECTS for the course. We recommend participation with a paper.

The paper will be presented and discussed in a paper seminar. For their paper, students are required to engage with and refer to some mandatory parts of the literature (see the literature list!) and to a relevant amount of extra literature of their own choice pertinent to their paper topics (for suggestions see e.g. Reference literature in the literature). Students choose their own specialization, preferably in line with their topic of doctoral research.

Papers can be written either in the form of a scientific article or as a chapter for their dissertation, or as a standard academic paper. 10.000 words (maximum) including abstract and references.

Some useful advice on how to write a social scientific article is found in the links below:

https://www.una.edu/writingcenter/docs/Writing-Resources/Writing%20in%20the%20Social%20Science%20Format.pdf

http://neoacademic.com/2014/07/16/how-to-write-a-publishable-social-scientific-research-article-exploring-your-process/

http://pages.ucsd.edu/~keferree/Writing%20a%20Good%20Social%20Science%20Paper.htm

Learning outcomes 3,5 ECTS

After completion of the course the doctoral student shall be able to:

1. Knowledge and understanding

  • Present and discuss a broad overview of the different approaches in the sociology of emotions in general and of theoretical assumptions within the chosen areas of specialization in particular
  • State and analyze the main empirical results within the chosen area of specialization
  • Present and discuss current areas of conflict within the chosen area of specialization

2. Competence and skills

  • Present, explain and problematize research within the sociology of emotions.
  • In a synopsis for a paper discuss the theories and research with regards to the chosen area of  specialization.

3. Judgment and approach

  • Critically discuss theoretical assumptions and empirical results within the sociology of emotions in general and the chosen area of specialization in particular.

Types of assessment 3,5 ECTS

The student's performance is assessed by a) active participation at lectures, b) a synopsis for a paper and c) participation in two seminars.

Learning outcomes 7,5 ECTS

After completion of the course the doctoral student shall be able to:

1. Knowledge and understanding

  • Present and discuss a broad overview of the different approaches in the sociology of emotions in general and of theoretical assumptions within the chosen areas of specialization in particular
  • State and analyze the main empirical results within the chosen area of specialization
  • Present and discuss current areas of conflict within the chosen area of specialization

2. Competence and skills

  • Orally and in writing present, explain and problematize research within the sociology of emotions in a format that meets international standards.
  • In a more elaborate paper synthesize the theories and research within the chosen area of specialization and construct a theoretical framework and methodological approach to a specific research problem in the student’s own ongoing or planned project.

3. Judgment and approach

  • Critically discuss theoretical assumptions and empirical results within the sociology of emotions in general and the chosen area of specialization in particular.
  • Critically discuss methods used within the chosen area of specialization.
  • Critically discuss trends and future development of the chosen area of specialization.

Types of assessment 7,5 ECTS

The student’s performance is assessed by a) active participation at lectures b) an individual course paper and c) participation in two seminars where one’s own work is presented and others’ work is discussed actively.

Grading and criteria

The grading scale encompasses the grades Fail (U), and Pass (G).

Pass = the student demonstrates satisfactory fulfillment of the learning outcomes through active participation in all the parts of the course, and by the submission of an exam paper.

Course evaluation

Course evaluation is organized by the teachers on the paper seminars. 

Important dates

  • March 9 – 11, 2021: Course introduction, lectures; held at the University of Copenhagen.
  • April 27 2022: Midterm seminar, online
  • June 9-10, 2022: Lectures and paper seminars, held at the University of Gothenburg

Deadlines

  • 17 January: Registration sent to phd@hrsc.ku.dk
  • 23 February: 2000 words (maximum) description of the students’ doctoral research (research questions, context, methods, theoretical framework) and the role of the sociology of emotions in the project. These short papers will form the basis of the workshops in Copenhagen. 
  • 19 April 5 pm: Synopsis of course paper, 1500-2000 words, to Åsa, Merete and Poul and peers to discuss in the online seminar.
  • 30 Maj 11 pm: Full paper draft to peer group and Åsa, Merete and Poul                         
  • 1 June: Commentators list is circulated. Each student will be the primary commentator on one paper and the secondary commentator on one more (but preferably read all).
  • 11 July 11 pm: Final papers sent to Åsa, Merete and Poul and phd@hrsc.ku.dk                                

Further information

Contact Åsa, Meret, or Poul if you have any queries!

Course schedule

Date

Time

Place

Topic

Teacher

Reading

9. March 2022

13.00-13.30

Department of Sociology, University of Copenhagen

Introduction and presentation

Åsa Wettergren

Poul Poder

Merete Monrad

 

 

 

13.30-15.00

 

Introduction to the sociology of emotions and emotions in the classics

Åsa Wettergren

 

Bericat (2016) Review

Barbalet (1998) Chapters 1, 2

Barbalet (2002) Chapter: Science and Emotions

Schilling in Barbalet (2002) The two traditions…

Thoits (1998) Review

Turner & Stets (2006) review

 

15.00 -15.30

 

Coffee

 

 

 

15.30-17.00

 

Interactional perspectives

Poul Poder

Collins (1993)

Collins & Rössel  (2002)

Collins (2014) 

Clark, C. (1987)

Clark, C. (1990)

Hochschild (1979)

 

17.00-17.30

 

Coffee

 

 

 

17.30-19.00

 

 

Workshop: relating projects to theory and methodology based on student presentations

Åsa Wettergren Poul Poder

Merete Monrad

 

 

19.30

 

Dinner

 

 

10. March 2022

9.00 – 10.30

 

Affect, discourse and governance

Merete Monrad

Wetherell (2012)

Ahmed (2004a)

 

10.30-11.00

 

Coffee

 

 

 

11.00-12.30

 

Workshop: relating projects to theory and methodology based on student presentations

Åsa Wettergren Poul Poder

Merete Monrad

 

 

12.30-13.15

 

Lunch

 

 

 

13.15-14.45

 

Emotions in organizations

Merete Monrad/Åsa Wettergren

Bolton and Boyd (2003)

Bergman Blix & Wettergren (2016) Article

Fineman (2000),

Flam in Barbalet (2002) Chapter Corporate emotions…

Hochschild (1983) 1979

Lively (2007)

Sieben & Wettergren (2010)

Chapters Intro, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 10, 13

Wettergren & Bergman Blix (2016) Article

 

 

14.45-15.00

 

Coffee

 

 

 

15.00-17.00

 

TBA

Eva Illouz

 

 

18.00

 

Dinner

 

 

11. March 2022

9.00-10.30

 

Structural perspectives

Åsa Wettergren

 

Barbalet (1998) Chapters 3-7

Kemper in Barbalet (2002) Chapter Predicting Emotions…

Kemper (1978) Article

Scheer (2012) Article

 

 

10.30-11.00

 

Coffee

 

 

 

11.00-12.00

 

Workshop: relating projects to theory and methodology based on student presentations issues

Åsa Wettergren Poul Poder

Merete Monrad

 

 

12.00-12.45

 

Lunch

 

 

 

12.45-13.45

 

Emotions in violence

Poul Poder

Turner (2007)

Collins (2009)

Scheff (2011)

 

13.45-14.00

 

Break

 

 

 

14.00-14.30

 

The article format and finding a journal

Åsa Wettergren

 

 

27 April 2022

 

13.00-16.00

Online

Abstract seminars

Poul Poder

Åsa Wettergren

Merete Monrad

 

9. June 2022

13.00-15.00

Department of Sociology and Work Science at the University of Gothenburg

Lecture on Methods and methodological approaches – examples from our own studies

Åsa Wettergren

Merete Monrad

 

 

 

 

15.00-15.30

 

Coffee

 

 

 

15.30-17.10

 

Paper seminar 1

Poul Poder

Åsa Wettergren

Merete Monrad,

 

 

 

17.10-17.30

 

Coffee

 

 

 

17.30-18.15

 

Paper seminar 2

 

 

 

19.00

 

Dinner

 

 

10. June 2019

9.00-10.40

 

Paper seminar 3

 

 

 

10.40-11.00

 

Coffee

 

 

 

11.00-11.45

 

Paper seminar 4

 

 

 

11.45-12.30

 

Lunch

 

 

 

12.30-13.30

 

Evaluation

 

 

 

Literature Sociology of Emotions

Mandatory books

Barbalet J. M. (1998) Emotion, Social Theory, and Social Structure - A Macrosociological Approach, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (170 pages)

Barbalet, Jack  (ed.) (2002) Emotions and Sociology, Blackwell Publishing  (All chapters, (168 pages)

Wetherell M. (2012) Affect and Emotion. A new social science understanding., London: SAGE. (160 pages)


Mandatory articles/chapters (chapters will be provided)

Ahmed, S. (2004a). "Affective economies." Social Text, 79 22(2): 117-139.

Bericat E. (2016) The sociology of emotions: Four decades of progress. Current Sociology 64 491-513.

Collins, R. (1993) Emotional Energy as the Common Denominator of Rational Action, Rationality and Society 5 (2), 203-230

Collins; Randall & Rössel, Jorg (2002) Conflict Theory and Interactional Rituals – The Microfoundations of Conflict Theory,  Handbook of Sociological Theory (red.) Jonathan Turner, New York: Kluwer Academic. P 509-531.

Clark, Candace (2004): “Emotional Gifts and ‘You First’ Micropolitics - Niceness in the Socioemotional Economy”, in Manstead, Anthony; Frijda, Nico & Agneta Fischer (red.): Feelings and Emotions – The Amsterdam Symposium. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. s. 404-421

Clark, C. (1987). "Sympathy Biography and Sympathy Margin." The American Journal of Sociology 93(2): 290-321.

Hochschild, A. R. (1979) Emotion work, feeling rules and social structure.   American Journal of Sociology 85, 551-575

Illouz, E. (2007). Cold intimacies: The making of emotional capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press. Chapter 2, pp. 40-73

Kemper, Theodor D. (2011) “Status and Power” (chap. 2), in Status, Power and Ritual Interaction – A Relational reading of Durkheim, Goffman and Collins. Ashgate, Farnham, UK.

Kemper, Theodore D. (1978) “Toward a Sociology of Emotions: Some Problems and Some Solutions.” American Sociologist 13(1): 30–41.

Scheff, Thomas J. (2000) “Shame and the Social Bond. A Sociological Theory.” Sociological Theory 18:1, 84-99

Scheff, Thomas (2006) “What Is This Thing Called Love? The Three A’s: Attachment, Attunement, and Attraction”. S. 111–24 i Goffman Unbound!: A New Paradigm for Social Science. Routledge.

Thoits, P. A. (1989) The Sociology of Emotions. Annual Review of Sociology, 15, 317-342.

In total about 800 pp. Additional books/articles in the Sociology of Emotions corresponding to the student’s own choice of perspective in the course paper (about 700 pages).
 

Reference literature – Extra reading for lectures and for further inquiry

For the lectures

Ahmed, S. (2008). "Sociable happiness." Emotion, Space and Society 1(1): 10-13.

Ahmed, S. (2004). "Collective Feelings." Theory, Culture & Society 21(2): 25-42.

Ahmed, S. (2004). "Affective economies." Social Text, 79 22(2): 117-139.

Ahmed, S. (2001). ‘The Organisation of Hate’, Law and Critique, 12, 3: 345-365.

Bericat E. (2016) The sociology of emotions: Four decades of progress. Current Sociology 64 491-513.

Bergman Blix, Stina & Wettergren, Åsa (2016). ”A Sociological Perspective on Emotions in the Judiciary”, Emotion Review, Vol 8, 32-37

Collins, R. (1993) Emotional Energy as the Common Denominator of Rational Action, Rationality and Society 5 (2)

Collins; Randall & Rössel, Jorg (2002) Conflict Theory and Interactional Rituals – The Microfoundations of Conflict Theory,  Handbook of Sociological Theory (red.) Jonathan Turner, New York: Kluwer Academic. P 509-531.

Collins, Randall (2009), “Micro and Macro Causes of Violence.” International Journal of Conflict and Violence 3: 9-22, 2009.

Hochschild, A. R. (1983). The Managed Heart - Commercialization of Human Feeling. Los Angeles: University of California Press. Uddrag 50 s.

Flam H and Kleres J. (2015) Methods of exploring emotions. London: Routledge. (Selected chapters, about 50 pp pp)

Jasper, J. (2011) Emotions and social movements: Twenty years of theory and research, The Annual Review of Sociology, 37: 285-303.

Sieben, B., & Wettergren, Å. (Eds.). (2010). Emotionalizing Organizations and Organizing Emotions. London: Palgrave MacMillan. (selected chapters)

Scheer, M. (2012) Are emotions a kind of practice (and is that what makes them have a history)? A Bourdieuan approach to understanding emotions, History and Theory, 51:193-220

Scheff , Thomas J.  (2011) Social–emotional origins of violence: A theory of multiple killing

Aggression and Violent Behavior 16 (2011) 453–460

Turner, Jonathan H. (2007) “Self, Emotions, and Extreme Violence: Extending Symbolic Interactionist Theorizing” Symbolic Interaction, 30 4: 501-530.

Wettergren, Åsa & Bergman Blix, Stina (2016). “Empathy and Objectivity in the Legal Procedure: The Case of Swedish Prosecutors”. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 17:1, 19-35 DOI: 10.1080/14043858.2015.1136501

Methodological literature

Bergman Blix S and Wettergren Å. (2015) The emotional labour of gaining and maintaining access to the field. Qualitative Research 15: 688–704.

Bloch C. (1996) Emotions and discourse. Text 16: 323-341.

Ellis, C. (1991), Sociological Introspection and Emotional Experience. Symbolic Interaction, 14: 23–50. doi:10.1525/si.1991.14.1.23

Flam H and Kleres J. (2015) Methods of exploring emotions. London: Routledge.

Rosenwein BH (2002) Worrying about emotions in history. The American Historical Review 107(3): 821-845.

Rosenwein BH (2010) Problems and Methods in the History of Emotions. Passions in Context 2010(1): 1-32.

Roach Anleu S, Bergman Blix S and Mack K. (2015a) Researching emotion in courts and the judiciary: A tale of two projects. Emotion Review 7: 145-150.

Roach Anleu S, Bergman Blix S, Mack K, and Wettergren, Å (2015b) Observing judicial work and emotions: Using two researchers. Qualitative Reseach.

Generic (introductions, collected volumes, perspectives, etc)

Craig Calhoun (2001) Putting emotions in their place, in Goodwin, J., Jasper, J. M., & Polletta, F. (Eds.). (2001). Passionate Politics - Emotions and Social Movements. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Burkitt, I. (2014) Emotions and Social Relations, London: SAGE 207pp

Gillian Bendelow (Editor) (1997) Emotions in Social Life: Critical Themes and Contemporary Issues Routledge

Glavind Bo, Inger & Hviid Jacobsen, Michael (2017) Følelsernes sociologi, Hans Reitzels Forlag

Glavind Bo, Inger & Hviid Jacobsen, Michael (red.) (2015) Hverdagslivets følelser: tilstande, relationer, kulturer. Hans Reitzel

Hopkins D, Kleres J, Flam H, et al. (2009) Theorizing Emotions: Sociological Explorations and Applications. Frankfurt: Campus.

Olson, R. E., et al. (2017). "The sociology of emotions: A meta-reflexive review of a theoretical tradition in flux." Journal of Sociology 53(4): 800-818.

Poder, P 2015, Mod - satsninger i mange former og grader. i I Glavind Bo & M Hviid Jacobsen (red), Hverdagslivets følelser: tilstande, relationer, kulturer. Hans Reitzel, Sociologi, nr. 7, s. 281-302.

Reddy, W. (2001). The Navigation of Feeling - A Framework for the History of Emotions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Spencer, D., Walby, K. & Hunt, A. (2012) Emotions Matter – A relational Approach to Emotions. Toronto: University of Toronto

Stearns, P. N. (1994). American Cool - Constructing a Twentieth-Century Emotional Style (Vol. 3). New York: New York University.

Jonathan H. Turner and  Jan E. Stets 2005,  The Sociology of Emotions, Cambridge University Press

Turner, J. H., & Stets, J. E. (2007) Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions. New York: Springer.

Wetherell, M (2014) "Trends in the turn to affect: A social psychological critique." Body & Society 21 (2): 139-166

Wettergren Å. (2012) Emotionssociologi, Malmö: Gleerups.

Wettergren, Å. (2017). "Commentary: Sociology of emotions from an embedded perspective." Journal of Sociology 53(4): 819-821.

Social movements and politics

Bramsen, I & Poder, P 2019, How conflict escalation happens: three central interaction rituals in conflict . i I Bramsen, P Poder & O Wæver (red), Resolving International Conflict: Dynamics of Escalation, Continuation and Transformation. Routledge, Routledge Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution

Bloch, C, Liebst, LS, Poder, P, Maria Christiansen, J & Heinskou, MB 2018, 'Caring Collectives and Other Forms of Bystander Helping Behavior in Violent Situations', Current Sociology.

Flam, H., & King, D. (Eds.). (2005). Emotions and Social Movements. London: Routledge.

Gould, D. B. (2009). Moving politics: emotion and ACT UP's fight against AIDS. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Goodwin, J., Jasper, J. M., & Polletta, F. (Eds.). (2001). Passionate Politics - Emotions and Social Movements. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Hansson, N. and Jacobsson, K. (2014) Learning to be Affected: Subjectivity, Sense and Sensibility in Animal Rights Activism, Society & Animals, (22)3, 262-288

Jacobsson, Kerstin & Lindblom Jonas (2013) “Emotion work in animal rights activism: A moral-sociological perspective”, Acta Sociologica, 56(1), 55-68.

Jacobsson, K. &  Lindblom, J. (2017) Animal Rights Activism: A Moral-Sociological Perspective on Social Movements, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press

Johnson, C. (2005). "Narratives of identity: Denying empathy in conservative discourses on race, class, and sexuality." Theory and Society 34: 37–61.                   

Johnson, C. (2010). "The politics of affective citizenship: from Blair to Obama, ." Citizenship Studies 14(5): 495-509.       

Johnson, C. (2013). " FROM OBAMA TO ABBOTT." Australian Feminist Studies, 28(75): 14-29.

Kleres J and Wettergren Å (2017) Fear, hope, anger, and guilt in climate activism. Social Movement Studies 16(5): 507-519.

Poder, P & Rothbart, D 2017, Systemic humiliation as daily social suffering. i RE Anderson (red.), Alleviating World Suffering:The Challenge of Negative Quality of Life. Springer, Springer International Publishing).

Poder, P & Bramsen, I 2014, 'Theorizing Three Basic Emotional Dynamics of Conflicts: A Situational Research Agenda' Peace Research, bind 46, nr. 2 , s. 51-86.

Poder, P & Bramsen, I 2018, Emotional Dynamics in Conflict and Conflict Transformation. i Berghof research center for constructive conflict management. Berghof Foundation, Berlin, s. 2-15.

Wettergren Å (2009) Fun and Laughter: Culture Jamming and the Emotional Regime of Late Capitalism. Social Movement Studies 8(1): 1-16.

Emotional politics, governance and emotions in discursive perspectives

Ahmed, S. (2008). "Sociable happiness." Emotion, Space and Society 1(1): 10-13.

Ahmed, S. (2004). "Collective Feelings." Theory, Culture & Society 21(2): 25-42.

Ahmed, S. (2004). "Affective economies." Social Text, 79 22(2): 117-139.

Jupp, E., Pykett, J., & Smith, F. M. (Eds.). (2016). Emotional states: Sites and spaces of affective governance Routledge. Introduction, chapter 2, chapter 15.

Prieur, A. I., Jensen, S. Q., Laursen, J., & Pedersen, O. (2016). ’Social Skills’: Following a Travelling Concept from American Academic Discourse to Contemporary Danish Welfare Institutions. Minerva, 54(4), 423-443.

Johnson, C. (2005). Narratives of identity: Denying empathy in conservative discourses on race, class, and sexuality. Theory and Society, 34, 37–61.

Johnson, C. (2010). The politics of affective citizenship: from Blair to Obama, . Citizenship Studies, 14(5), 495-509. doi:10.1080/13621025.2010.506702

Johnson, C. (2013). FROM OBAMA TO ABBOTT. Australian Feminist Studies,, 28(75), 14-29. doi:10.1080/08164649.2012.759311

Warner, J. (2015). The emotional politics of social work and child protection. Bristol: Policy Press.

Ahmed S. (2004) The Cultural Politics of Emotion, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Organisations and workplaces

Bloch C. (2012) Passion and Paranoia. Emotions and the Culture of Emotion in Academia. Farnham: Ashgate.

Bolton, S. C. (2005). Emotion management in the workplace. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.

Bolton, S. C. (2010). Old ambiguities and new developments: Exploring the emotional labour process. In P. Thompson, & C. Smith (Eds.), Working life (pp. 205-211). London: Palgrave.

Bolton, S. C., & Boyd, C. (2003). Trolley dolly or skilled emotion manager? Moving on from Hochschild's managed hearth. Work, Employment and Society, 17(2), 289-308.

Bergman Blix, S. & Wettergren, Å. (2018) Professional Emotions in Court – A Sociological Perspective. London: Routledge

Dahl, H. M. (2009). New public management, care and struggles about recognition. Critical Social Policy, 29(4), 634-654.

Dirk Lindebaum (2017) Emancipation Through Emotion Regulation at Work, Edward Elgar

https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781786436320.xml  (NOTE: Chapter one is free to access):

Reviews of this book:

http://amle.aom.org/content/early/2017/07/27/amle.2017.0281.abstract

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1350508417714522

Fineman, Stephen (ed) (2000, Second Edition) Emotion in Organizations, London: SAGE

Grandey, A. A., & Gabriel, A. S. (2015). Emotional labor at a crossroads: Where do we go from here? The Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 2, 323-349.

Hochschild, A. R. (1983). The Managed Heart - Commercialization of Human Feeling. Los Angeles: University of California Press.

Hochschild, A. R. (2000). The Time Bind. When Work Becomes Home and Home Becomes Work. New York: Owl books.

Hochschild, A. R. (2003a). The Commercialization of Intimate Life - Notes from Home and Work. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Lively, K. J. (2007). Emotions in the workplace. In J. E. Stets, & J. H. Turner (Eds.), Handbook of the sociology of emotions (pp. 569-590). New York: Springer.

Lopez, S. H. (2006). Emotional labor and organized emotional care: Conceptualizing nursing home care work. Work and Occupations, 33(2), 133-160.

Poder, P 2013, Lidelse og omsorg i organisationens skygge. i NCM Nickelsen (red.), Arbejdslivets skyggesider. 1. udgave udg, Klim, Århus, Moderne arbejdsliv, s. 177-196.

Poder, P 2010, 'Når medarbejdere håndterer hinandens følelser: Om betydningen af kollegers ‘other emotion management' for deres identitetsarbejde' Tidsskrift for Arbejdsliv, bind 12, nr. 3, s. 72-86.

Sieben, B., & Wettergren, Å. (Eds.). (2010). Emotionalizing Organizations and Organizing Emotions. London: Palgrave MacMillan.

Wettergren Å (2010) Managing unlawful feelings: the emotional regime of the Swedish migration board. International Journal for Work, Organisation and Emotion 3(4): 400-419.

Gender and emotions

Björk, S. (2017). "Emotions and empathic imagination:  Parents relating to norms of work, parenthood and gender equality." Families, Relationships and Societies.

Hochschild, A. R. (2003b). The Second Shift. New York: Penguin Books.

Enander, V. (2010). "“A Fool to Keep Staying”: Battered Women Labeling Themselves Stupid as an Expression of Gendered Shame." Violence Against Women 16(1): 5-31.              

Enander, V. (2011). "Leaving Jekyll and Hyde: Emotion work in the context of intimate partner violence." Feminism & Psychology 21(1): 29-48.

Koziak, B. (1999). "Homeric Thumos: The Early History of Gender, Emotion, and Politics." The Journal of Politics 61(4): 1068-1091.

Lewis, K. M. (2000). "When Leaders Display Emotion: How Followers Respond to Negative Emotional Expression of Male and Female Leaders  " Journal of Organizational Behavior 21(2): 221-234

Patulny, R., et al. (2017). "Generalising men’s affective experiences." NORMA.

Plant, E. A., et al. (2000). "The gender steretyping of emotions." Psychology of Women Quarterly 24(1): 81-92.

Shields, S. A. (2002). Speaking from the Heart. Gender and the Social Meaning of Emotion. . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Thomas J. Scheff (2003) Male Emotions/Relationships and Violence: A Case Study, Human Relations Volume: 56 issue: 6, page(s): 727-749

Globalisation and emotions

Hochschild, A. R., & Ehrenreich, B. (2003). Global woman : nannies, maids, and sex workers in the new economy (1. ed.): Metropolitan Books Granta books.

Lindner, Evelin G. (2007a) ‘In Times of Globalization and Human Rights: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?’, Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 1 (1).

Lindner, Evelin G. (2007b) ‘Dynamics of Humiliation in a Globalizing World’, International Journal on World Peace 24 (3): 15–52.

Lindner, Evelin G. (2009) Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict. London: Praeger.

Smith, D. (2006). Globalization: the hidden agenda. Cambridge: Polity

Smith, D. (2008). Globalization, Degradation and the Dynamics of Humiliation. Current Sociology, 56(3), 371-379.

Love, identity, and capitalism

Engdahl, Emma (2018) Depressive Love, London, Routledge

Engdahl, Emma (2004) A theory of the Emotional Self, Avhandling, Örebro, Örebro universitet

Illouz, E. (1997). Consuming the Romantic Utopia. Love and the cultural contradictions of capitalism. California: University of California.

Illouz, E. (2007). Cold Intimacies. Cambridge: Polity Press.